What is STP – Roger Truelove Explains

 

Roger Truelove, Borough Councillor for Homewood

 

 

 

 

 

 

By the end of next year the Government hope to have made a radical change to our National Health Service. It is called Sustainability and Transformation Plan (STP) and in Kent it will be executed by a powerful Strategic Commissioner, with health practitioners being allowed only an advisory role.

The basic premise of STP is that we should reduce bed occupancy in acute general hospitals by making people more dependent for their own health care in their own homes. In the Labour Party we fear that financial pressures will reduce the options available to vulnerable people, whilst the continuing real term cuts to social care will make it undeliverable.

We also fear that behind STP is a wish to commission out fashionable and potentially lucrative parts of the NHS to private providers, including many from the USA. The Prime Minister’s evasive answer to this in the House of Commons rather supports our fear. What might be left behind is a number of struggling services like mental health, desperate for adequate finance and resourcing.

Even if some do not share our Labour misgivings, it is important that local people are properly informed, engaged and consulted in this historic change of direction. They are not. Small highly stage managed consultation meetings have been held but the public as a whole are being kept in the dark. It is impossible for elderly people who do not have internet access to be properly engaged.

It is frankly impossible to disentangle this process from the funding crisis in the Health Service. It is tiresome hearing the Health Minister, who is incidentally making it easy for himself to sell off NHS property, boasting about increases in funding when those increases never meet the growth in demand. We have an ageing population and vast improvements in medical technology. As a country we have to face the fact that we spend a much smaller proportion of our National wealth (GDP) on health and social care than other European Union countries. The gap was closed under the Blair government but it has widened ever since. The future looks bright for the few, but not for the many.

Roger Truelove

Rosie Duffield Guest of Honour at our Gala Dinner

 

 

 

 

 

Rosie Duffield addressing the meeting

 

Rosie Duffield, Labour MP for Canterbury, was our guest at the 2018 Labour Constituency Gala Fundraising Dinner held on February 2 at the  Hempstead House Hotel, Sittingbourne. The dinner was attended by members and supporters from Sittingbourne and Sheppey and from neighbouring constituencies as well. Rosie treated us to a fine, impassioned speech on her own trials and tribulations in becoming Kent’s only Labour MP last year  and the steps we might take to emulate her success.  She then took questions from the floor. Thanks to Rosie and her Fiancé Michael for attending, to  all who helped organise the event and to Hempstead House Hotel for the lovely venue and meal.

 

 

 

 

 

Diners getting ready to enjoy the evening

 

 

 

 

Rosie with Local Councillors Roger Truelove, Tony Winckless and Ghlin Whelan  and CLP Chair Simon Clark and Vice Chair Georgina Jessiman

Happy Christmas!

Sittingbourne and Sheppey Labour Party would like to wish all our Members and Supporters a Very Merry Christmas.

Save Our Buses

KCC are considering a study to cut £4M off the Bus subsidies budget. This could decimate services around Sittingbourne and the vilages. You can protest by signing the Petition here: http://chn.ge/2ihMk6K

Labour Councillors Renew Call for Affordable Housing

Councillors Truelove and Whelan

Local Labour Councillors have been doing so for some time but the public also need to protest if they genuinely want affordable housing – an article by Kay Murphy

Swale News Extra has reported more than once on developers reducing the number of affordable houses they build.  They can do this using a legal loophole after planning permission has been granted.  Based on the number of affordable houses they’ve given in the planning application, developers can later submit a viability assessment that argues it’s no longer financially viable to build that number and arguing for a reduction.  Consultants are willing to help developers, advertising for example, ‘a good track record for securing reductions’ (in the number of affordable homes to be built) ‘including removing the requirement altogether’.  The financial figures ‘proving’ the developers’ case are covered by commercial confidentiality so can’t usually be made public.

The battle for affordable housing isn’t being fought on an even playing field when developers are able to use viability assessments to maximise their profits by reducing the number of homes they build.

With so many developers wanting to build in Swale’ the public needs to be aware of what’s happening and start protesting.  Viability assessments should be open to public scrutiny.  The tide is turning, communities are beginning to take action – and some are winning.